Monday, October 15, 2012

Ashes to ashes..

'Wigandia' garden prepares itself for its silver jubilee In a couple of years time.....
 
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3 comments:

  1. You know, I was going to say something about how sad it is to lose plants, but then I looked at this photo again and remembered Billy that one of its best features of 'Wigandia' is its aliveness, is its capacity to absorb change, and to reflect it. Perhaps city gardeners aren't quite so prepared to risk 'appearances', but really, it signals your garden's vivacity that loss/dying/transformation can be taken on board as part of a natural process, and even look good. There's a certain grandeur about 'letting your garden happen'.

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  2. Faisal, this is the third furcraea to topple over and my biggest is not far off it! One of these i had to remove as it was in a really sill spot but the second I allowed to lay until it decided (an unknown quantity) to turn its head skyward a to great a new vertical trunk! That is now flowering and will die when finished! The current prostrate specimen closes of the former 'turning cicle' nicely and i will allow it to do it own thing! Just a few roots are still in the ground and it should live! Thanks for you great comment..what a shocker of a Spring we are having wot! Give me the hills of Thailand!

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  3. I was just looking at some recent changes in our tiny garden and appreciating that there was a difference, something new to observe, to watch grow. And I can recall a client telling me about how a specimen died in the garden I created for her and as she could not find the same plant, she replaced it with another and hoped I didn't mind. I was over the moon that she felt ownership of her landscape so quickly and that she also understood its underlying concepts enough to have chosen such a good replacement all on her own!
    In a garden, as in life, the only constant is change.

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