Friday, June 17, 2011

5 reasons to be cheerful (for early Winter)

Aeonium tabuliforme

This Species from the Canary Islands is rather special. It forms a very flat profile and i believe its preferred habitat is growing similar to mine on a rock cliff type situation..sadly this species dies after flowering (it is developing central flowering stem now) and this is my LAST specimen! It also is happiest growing (like many Aeonium) in part shade or rather shelter from hot afternoon sun. I am fairly sure I purchased my specimens from Rudolf Schultz who owned a great succulent nursery about 2 hours from my garden.. He has however scampered to New Zealand but has written a great book on this tribe. http://www.amazon.com/Aeonium-Rudolf-Schulz/dp/B0049XJXHA




An English Garden Critic looms small in an Australian Bottle Tree. see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brachychiton_rupestris


A yellow flowering form of Aloe macualata (I am not quite comfortable about the naming though)
http://www.google.com.au/search?sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8&q=aloe+macualata+yellow+form
Not as prolific as the standard orange but its a rather special form.


I am taking bookings for the "Wigandia Intergalactic Un-design Extravaganza' (only one ticket per show)

 
A truly wonderful top seat is available for this totally egalitarian event without grace or favour. The delegate will enjoy the many delights to be had in this unique and truly wonderful part of the Galaxy. A cut lunch (and Thermos) will be provided and our truly wonderful 400 gallon rainwater supply will be on tap 24 hours a day for the duration of your truly wonderful experience.
Inspiration is optional.

Living Dangerously.

It has been suggested to me that I should 'Live Dangerously' and attend a Melbourne Landscape Design conference later this year. Apparently the speakers from around the globe will 'inspire' etc. Mmmmm the internet and book-stands are awash with many varied international 'idea's' if one is inclined to harvest them and try a hand at utilising them.
My answer to the suggestion was I have a perfectly good set of eyes and can find many 'inspirational' idea's and concepts AROUND me..it is little wonder the world of Landscape Architecture and garden design has become a wishy washy mix of design snippets wherever one might travel. (of course with exceptions)
The gardens (design) I admire most are those which have been created by individuals who have looked to their own mind (and of the utmost importance ..the OTHER ARTS) and region for 'inspiration' and NOT the copy book (though often splendid) excuses for creativity we are seeing more and more.
The person who suggested the above I might add has never found the time to visit MY Internationally acclaimed garden despite its only 2.5 hours drive from the city.....but I believe many gardens abroad.  'Wigandia' is known in many quarters as one of the most AUSTRALIAN (flavoured) gardens known and one of the more creative....Perhaps it is not international enough!
Let us pray.




P.S. Give me bad originality over good Plagiarism  ANY day!

grass is life.



















Occasionally I like to combine images in a collage process. Certain images are taken with this work in mind, Within this shot are the Asiatic Miscanthus and for some local Australian flavour the 'tussock' or Poa.Some faint slithers of my favourite tree are noticeable in the background. (Allocasuarina verticillata)
 http://www.florabank.org.au/lucid/key/Species%20Navigator/Media/Html/Allocasuarina_verticillata.htm
http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/agriculture/field/pastures-and-rangelands/species-varieties/native-grasses/poa-tussock-or-tussock-grass
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miscanthus












Archival qualities prints are available for purchase A4/A3