Friday, June 17, 2011

5 reasons to be cheerful (for early Winter)

Aeonium tabuliforme

This Species from the Canary Islands is rather special. It forms a very flat profile and i believe its preferred habitat is growing similar to mine on a rock cliff type situation..sadly this species dies after flowering (it is developing central flowering stem now) and this is my LAST specimen! It also is happiest growing (like many Aeonium) in part shade or rather shelter from hot afternoon sun. I am fairly sure I purchased my specimens from Rudolf Schultz who owned a great succulent nursery about 2 hours from my garden.. He has however scampered to New Zealand but has written a great book on this tribe. http://www.amazon.com/Aeonium-Rudolf-Schulz/dp/B0049XJXHA




An English Garden Critic looms small in an Australian Bottle Tree. see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brachychiton_rupestris


A yellow flowering form of Aloe macualata (I am not quite comfortable about the naming though)
http://www.google.com.au/search?sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8&q=aloe+macualata+yellow+form
Not as prolific as the standard orange but its a rather special form.

9 comments:

  1. Your photographs are incredible! These are the pictures I couldn't get at the other day - so glad I was able to access them.

    Thanks for stopping by our blog... no, our gardening style is not anywhere close to yours, but the climate, geography and hardiness zones are half a world away. ;)

    I looked through your several of previous posts... the photography is astounding and your subjects very interesting. Had a great time visiting... I'm sure I'll be back again and often!

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  2. Although your jaunty rabbit has caught my eye, Billy, it's the flattened aeonium I especially like, growing out of its wall of stones like a mushroom. Does it have a common name?

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  3. Cathy and Steve said...
    Your photographs are incredible! These are the pictures I couldn't get at the other day - so glad I was able to access them.

    Thanks for stopping by our blog... no, our gardening style is not anywhere close to yours, but the climate, geography and hardiness zones are half a world away. ;)

    I looked through your several of previous posts... the photography is astounding and your subjects very interesting. Had a great time visiting... I'm sure I'll be back again and often.

    Hi C&S, Thanks for calling by..I am a great believer in choosing the right plants to suit your given climate and growing conditions..so many gardeners follow silly gardening models because of the LOOK and do not consider the gross waste of resources in pursuing such looks if they are not suitable for your own growing conditions. And anyway why do the many have to follow the LOOK when we are all quite capable of achieving our OWN look!
    Thanks for you kind comments about my snaps..the camera is my main gardening tool!

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  4. Gardener in the Distance said...
    Although your jaunty rabbit has caught my eye, Billy, it's the flattened aeonium I especially like, growing out of its wall of stones like a mushroom. Does it have a common name?
    Yikes Faisal if you must know it comes with a few commoners including 'dinner plate'
    If I had my way I would rename it 'SPLAT' ..consider it done...

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  5. Cathy and Steve said...
    Your photographs are incredible! These are the pictures I couldn't get at the other day - so glad I was able to access them.
    Ha I will tell you a funny story..English author and garden critic Tim Richardson informed me recently that the English 'Gardens Illustrated' wished to have him write a feature story on my garden (it would have been the 2nd feature of 'wigandia' in this mag ) BUT G.I. did NOT want to use my photographs...work that out! I am quite sure the photographer they had in mind would do a fine job but as i regard my half decent photography to be as much part of the creative process of my garden work I am not even remotely interested in 'dividing' up that creativity. It makes one wonder how and why such decisions are made by such magazines!

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  6. William

    Can you not pull a few leaves of that aeonium and push them into damp sand somewhere sheltered, I bet they'd root?

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  7. Hi Billy good to see plant descriptions and info with the images.
    Helps the Amateurs like myself.

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  8. Rob (ourfrenchgarden) said...
    William

    Can you not pull a few leaves of that aeonium and push them into damp sand somewhere sheltered, I bet they'd root?

    June 19, 2011 5:15 AM

    YES Rob..this species or so i am told is one of the few species of Aeonium which WILL propagate by leaf 'cutting'.Dopey me! I will get a few done..I almost never propagate anything other than division these days. Thanks for the heads up Rob.

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  9. Boyzo said...
    Hi Billy good to see plant descriptions and info with the images.
    Helps the Amateurs like myself.

    June 19, 2011 10:50 AM

    Thanks John and welcome aboard.
    i don't wish for this blog to be a 'how to do' affair but will most certainly be passing on the odd 'gardening' stuff..Will endeavor to keep a balnce between 'doing' and 'being'!

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